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What Does the Quality Mechanic Services in Southport Say Today?

By Kim Turner 07 Nov, 2017

This is a rumour that seems to be debunked over and over again and yet still this myth prevails, with a CHOICE survey showing that around 50% of people believed that they had to return to the dealership for servicing and that 90% of people who have recently bought a new car return to the dealership for servicing. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has made it clear that there is no such obligation to have your service be performed at the dealership, however warranty work must be done with the manufacturers approved repairer (typically the dealer).

There are however, a few exceptions to be aware of, a capped price servicing deal and an extended dealer warranty will require you to return to the dealer for services, all other warranties can be carried by a qualified mechanic. There are some specifications that must be followed to avoid voiding the warranty, these include that the service be done in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and that suitable quality parts are used.

Many dealers will tout the benefits of genuine parts, but these parts can often be much more expensive than good quality non-genuine parts. Using non-genuine parts doesn’t void your car’s warranty but will yield the same results. The specific part that is replaced will not be covered under the manufacturer’s warranty but if there are any issues with the part that was installed you should return to the mechanic to have the issue rectified.

Servicing is essential to your car’s performance and longevity but this doesn’t mean that you should be locked into a potentially expensive servicing schedule with the dealer, as with most things shop around for the best price.

By Kim Turner 23 Oct, 2017

Servicing your car every six month can seem like a chore but as the old saying goes ‘an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure’. Stretching the time between services or out-right ignoring your scheduled services can lead to significant damages to your car as well as significant repair costs. Despite the obvious value in having your car serviced only 52% of Australians service their car at either six or twelve month intervals (according to RACQ data).              

By Kim Turner 25 Sep, 2017

Your radiator is an essential part of your car’s engine and, just like everything else, it needs regular maintenance to keep your car running as it should.

When you check the radiator or top up your coolant, you need to do it correctly and safely. Practising good radiator safety will help prevent burns and injuries.

Watch the video or keep reading for step by step radiator safety advice.

THE IMPORTANCE OF RADIATOR SAFETY

Radiators can be very dangerous if they are not handled correctly. It’s possible to seriously burn yourself with steam and boiling coolant if you don’t follow the right precautions. Keep in mind:

  • Never open the radiator cap while the engine is hot
  • Never pour cold water over the outside of the radiator
  • Always use a protective glove and rag when opening the radiator cap

These are the basic precautions you need to follow to avoid burning yourself.

How to check the radiator

We recommend you check the coolant levels in your radiator at least once a month. If the coolant level has dropped, this could indicate a problem and you should seek advice.

To safely check and refill your radiator, you need to follow these steps:

1. Allow the engine to cool

Checking your radiator while the engine is still hot can be very dangerous. Allow your car to cool for a few hours after driving it before you open the radiator cap.

2. Use a protective glove and a rag to turn the radiator cap part way

Your car’s cooling system is pressurised to prevent the coolant from boiling if the engine temperature exceeds 100 degrees. If you open the radiator cap too quickly, the sudden loss of pressure can cause the coolant to boil instantly and cause serious injury.

Opening the cap part way will release the pressure slowly and safely. Remember that the radiator cap can be very hot and you turn it counter-clockwise to open it.

3. Open the radiator cap the rest of the way

Once the pressure has been safely released, you can finish opening the radiator cap the rest of the way. You can then check your coolant levels, top it up, and check for any other issues.

When do you need a new radiator?

You may need a new radiator if you notice:

  • High engine temperatures during normal driving
  • Loss of coolant
  • Steam from the front of your car
  • Radiator fins look damaged or clogged

You may also need to upgrade your cooling system to a heavy duty or performance radiator if you use your vehicle for towing or carrying heavy loads.

Things to remember

Your radiator maintains the correct temperature to protect your engine and automatic transmission while driving. If your engine is overheating, you need to get advice from a radiator specialist promptly to avoid potential damage to your engine.

Pouring cold water over an idling engine is an outdated technique which can be very dangerous on modern cars. This is because modern cars often have an aluminium radiator with a plastic tank. The plastic can become brittle over time and the sudden temperature change can cause it to crack and release steam.



By Search Marketing Specialists 04 Apr, 2017

Some suppliers use cheap radiators that are prone to failure, damage your car’s engine and cost you more in the long run. Cheap radiators are manufactured using low quality grade raw materials and below standard engineering methods, which restrict your car’s cooling system performance. 

Buying a cheap radiator is a bit like buying junk food for your car. Your engine and transmission is unable to perform at maximum efficiency, which can eventually lead to failure and a costly repair job. When you buy a quality radiator, you can enjoy years of trouble-free motoring and optimum performance with no hidden costs or problems.

Southport Radiators and Autocare's  motor mechanic in Gold Coast supply quality products so you have peace of mind that your car’s engine will always be protected from overheating.


By Search Marketing Specialists 04 Apr, 2017

1.   What is coolant, and what is its role?

Engine coolant is a formulation of chemicals that protect  engine components from corrosion and cavities while providing an effective heat exchange medium to remove excess heat from the engine.

2.   Can I mix coolants?

The safest answer is No. This is because it can be difficult to know: what coolant is in the engine; whether it has exceeded its service life; and if it contains depleted inhibitors or other contaminants. It is best to flush out the system and fill with new coolant.

3.   Is flushing the cooling system necessary?

If we don’t flush, light scale, sediments and depleted inhibitors remain in the system, which can lead to leaks, corrosion and overheating. Flushing before filling with fresh coolant also prevents contamination from the previous coolant. Flushing is especially important when changing to an Organic Additive Technology (OAT) coolant in order to achieving the maximum benefit of this technology.

4.   What product is best used for ‘top ups’?

You should top up with a premixed version of the same coolant that is already in the cooling system. If you are unsure about the coolant in your system, top up using good quality water.

5.   What is ‘good quality water’?

Ideally, ‘good quality water’ is distilled water or demineralised water.

6.   Why is it important to use ‘good quality water’ with Adrad concentrates?

Using good quality water ensures you do not introduce any minerals into the cooling system. Minerals can cause the build up of scale deposits.

7.   Can the quality of coolant be tested?

Yes. Using chemically treated test strips can provide an indication of the concentration of the coolant and presence of inhibitors and glycol.


By Kim Turner 07 Nov, 2017

This is a rumour that seems to be debunked over and over again and yet still this myth prevails, with a CHOICE survey showing that around 50% of people believed that they had to return to the dealership for servicing and that 90% of people who have recently bought a new car return to the dealership for servicing. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has made it clear that there is no such obligation to have your service be performed at the dealership, however warranty work must be done with the manufacturers approved repairer (typically the dealer).

There are however, a few exceptions to be aware of, a capped price servicing deal and an extended dealer warranty will require you to return to the dealer for services, all other warranties can be carried by a qualified mechanic. There are some specifications that must be followed to avoid voiding the warranty, these include that the service be done in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and that suitable quality parts are used.

Many dealers will tout the benefits of genuine parts, but these parts can often be much more expensive than good quality non-genuine parts. Using non-genuine parts doesn’t void your car’s warranty but will yield the same results. The specific part that is replaced will not be covered under the manufacturer’s warranty but if there are any issues with the part that was installed you should return to the mechanic to have the issue rectified.

Servicing is essential to your car’s performance and longevity but this doesn’t mean that you should be locked into a potentially expensive servicing schedule with the dealer, as with most things shop around for the best price.

By Kim Turner 23 Oct, 2017

Servicing your car every six month can seem like a chore but as the old saying goes ‘an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure’. Stretching the time between services or out-right ignoring your scheduled services can lead to significant damages to your car as well as significant repair costs. Despite the obvious value in having your car serviced only 52% of Australians service their car at either six or twelve month intervals (according to RACQ data).              

By Kim Turner 25 Sep, 2017

Your radiator is an essential part of your car’s engine and, just like everything else, it needs regular maintenance to keep your car running as it should.

When you check the radiator or top up your coolant, you need to do it correctly and safely. Practising good radiator safety will help prevent burns and injuries.

Watch the video or keep reading for step by step radiator safety advice.

THE IMPORTANCE OF RADIATOR SAFETY

Radiators can be very dangerous if they are not handled correctly. It’s possible to seriously burn yourself with steam and boiling coolant if you don’t follow the right precautions. Keep in mind:

  • Never open the radiator cap while the engine is hot
  • Never pour cold water over the outside of the radiator
  • Always use a protective glove and rag when opening the radiator cap

These are the basic precautions you need to follow to avoid burning yourself.

How to check the radiator

We recommend you check the coolant levels in your radiator at least once a month. If the coolant level has dropped, this could indicate a problem and you should seek advice.

To safely check and refill your radiator, you need to follow these steps:

1. Allow the engine to cool

Checking your radiator while the engine is still hot can be very dangerous. Allow your car to cool for a few hours after driving it before you open the radiator cap.

2. Use a protective glove and a rag to turn the radiator cap part way

Your car’s cooling system is pressurised to prevent the coolant from boiling if the engine temperature exceeds 100 degrees. If you open the radiator cap too quickly, the sudden loss of pressure can cause the coolant to boil instantly and cause serious injury.

Opening the cap part way will release the pressure slowly and safely. Remember that the radiator cap can be very hot and you turn it counter-clockwise to open it.

3. Open the radiator cap the rest of the way

Once the pressure has been safely released, you can finish opening the radiator cap the rest of the way. You can then check your coolant levels, top it up, and check for any other issues.

When do you need a new radiator?

You may need a new radiator if you notice:

  • High engine temperatures during normal driving
  • Loss of coolant
  • Steam from the front of your car
  • Radiator fins look damaged or clogged

You may also need to upgrade your cooling system to a heavy duty or performance radiator if you use your vehicle for towing or carrying heavy loads.

Things to remember

Your radiator maintains the correct temperature to protect your engine and automatic transmission while driving. If your engine is overheating, you need to get advice from a radiator specialist promptly to avoid potential damage to your engine.

Pouring cold water over an idling engine is an outdated technique which can be very dangerous on modern cars. This is because modern cars often have an aluminium radiator with a plastic tank. The plastic can become brittle over time and the sudden temperature change can cause it to crack and release steam.



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